Trevi Fountain, Pantheon

The Trevi Fountain marks the end point of an aqueduct.  Originally there was a simple basin to collect the water, but in 1730 Pope Clement XII commissioned a contest to build a more suitable fountain.  The official winner, one Allesandro Galilei was denied the job because he was a Florentine, and thus it was given to the Roman Nicola Salvi.  Work began in 1732 and continued for 30 years, at the end of which Oceanus, or Neptune carved by Pietro Bracci was set in the center.

The Pantheon was commissioned in 118AD by Emperor Hadrian, and is of a circular design.  It was the largest dome in the world until 1436, measuring 142 feet in diameter.  The  height of the occulus, or opening at the top which is the only source of light inside the building is also 142 feet high.

The massive 60 tons that support the portico were quarried in Egypt and moved by barge for construction.

This shot from inside the Panteon, which is now used as a church, shows persecutive of it’s size.

This shot taken inside the Pantheon shows how much light is let in by the single occulus 142 above the photographer.  The opening is 27 feet in diameter and the concrete is 6.5 feet thick.

The tour guide called these tall monuments story poles.  They are carved from top to bottom with scenes that are deciphered into a story.  They occupy several of the squares around Rome.

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