Piece de Resistance

Forgive my incorrect punctuation, but my knowledge of such matters as accents on a keyboard are slim.  Must correct that at some point.  Today I wanted to share with you my DH photo’s from our trip, as some of them are quite good.  I missed this guy, as he was on one of my no diving days.

I missed this guy as well.

When I saw this guy, I said, “What’s the matter with that sea horse?  Why is he all straight?”  DH rolled his eyes, then laughed.  “It’s a pipe fish.”  No, I’m not usually that slow.

I don’t know what this thing is, but his green color is beautiful.

This guy is called a Nudibranch.  They come in an amazing array of shapes, sizes and colors.

And the ever present Lion fish that has become such a problem.  It has no known natural predators, and therefore they have overpopulated the Caribbean.  The divers in Roatan have begun spear fishing them and feeding them to the eels to try to teach them they can eat them.  It has had good results, as now the eels are fat and happy (with the exception that when they see divers they now expect to be fed), and the lion fish population has become manageable.  This also means that everything they were eating are beginning to come back as well.

An excellent example of an fat and sassy Eel, being cleaned by a Banded Coral Shrimp.

This guy is called a Hogfish.

“Honey,” DH says, “THIS is a Seahorse…”

These guys are extremely difficult to photograph.  They are usually moving with a darting motion rather than a lazy swim, and they are skittish.

This little guy is called a Yellow Headed Jaw Fish.  They are able to raise their bodies out of those holes and drop straight back down , effectively swimming backwards in a downward motion.  It is very interesting to watch them.  The males will hold the eggs in their mouths to incubate them until they hatch.

This is a Patterson Cleaner Shrimp.  The yellow in the body are eggs.

We couldn’t figure out what this guy was, but he lit up like a neon sign.

This little guy was pecking away at the jelly fish to the left of him.

And the last photo, the fierce Barracuda.  All the ones we saw were around 4 feet long.

Advertisements